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ALTIJD DE SCHERPSTE PRIJS

30-DAGEN BEDENKTIJD

VEILIG SHOPPEN

GROOTSTE ASSORTIMENT VAN NEDERLAND

GRATIS VERZENDING BOVEN € 50,-

ALTIJD DE SCHERPSTE PRIJS

30-DAGEN BEDENKTIJD

VEILIG SHOPPEN

GROOTSTE ASSORTIMENT VAN NEDERLAND

Fostex Metaal logo 2nd Infantry Division

Sku: 443501

 15,75 incl. BTW
 13,02 excl. BTW

  • GRATIS VERZENDING BOVEN € 50,-
  • ALTIJD DE SCHERPSTE PRIJS
  • 30-DAGEN BEDENKTIJD

Productinformatie

Uniek Collectors item! Premium metalen logo van de 2nd Infantry Division. Een echt collectors item voor de liefhebber. Prachtig voor bij een WWII verzameling, voor op een WWII voertuig of gewoon ter herinnering aan de helden van de 2nd Infantry. Het logo is gemaakt van massief 3mm dik staal en wordt geleverd in een luxe doosje met in-lay. Bij het logo wordt ook 3M dubbelzijdig foam meegeleverd om het logo te bevestigen op bijv. metaal. Deze unieke serie van de Fostex WWII Series is ontwikkeld ter herinnering aan de Geallieerde strijdkrachten die tijdens WWII een ongekende bijdrage leverden. In de serie zijn nog 4 andere bekende metalen WWII logo’s uit metaal vervaardigd. Collect them all!

Kenmerken

The 2nd Infantry Division ("Indianhead";[1] "2ID," "2nd ID", or "Second D") is a formation of the United States Army. Its current primary mission is the pre-emptive defense of South Korea in the event of an invasion from North Korea. There are approximately 17,000 soldiers in the 2nd Infantry Division, with 10,000 of them stationed in South Korea,[2] accounting for about 35% of the United States Forces Korea personnel. The 2nd Infantry Division is unique in that it is the only U.S. Army division that is made up partially of South Korean soldiers, called KATUSAs (Korean Augmentation to the U.S. Army). This program began in 1950 by agreement with the first South Korean president, Syngman Rhee. Some 27,000 KATUSAs served with the U.S. forces at the end of the Korean War. As of May 2006, approximately 1,100 KATUSA soldiers serve with the 2ID. There were also more than 4,748 Dutch soldiers assigned to the division between 1950 and 1954.[3][4] Denoted the 2nd Infantry Division-ROK/U.S. Combined Division, the division is augmented by rotational BCTs from the rest of the U.S. Army's divisions.[5]

World War II[edit]

Assignments in European Theater of Operations[edit]

  1. 22 October 1943: Attached to First Army
  2. 24 December 1943: XV Corps, but attached to First Army
  3. 14 April 1944: V Corps, First Army
  4. 1 August 1944: V Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group
  5. 17 August 1944: XIX Corps
  6. 18 August 1944: VIII Corps, Third Army, 12th Army Group
  7. 5 September 1944: VIII Corps, Ninth Army, 12th Army Group
  8. 22 October 1944: VIII Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group
  9. 11 December 1944: V Corps
  10. 20 December 1944: Attached, with the entire First Army, to the British 21st Army Group
  11. 18 January 1945: V Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group
  12. 28 April 1945: VII Corps
  13. 1 May 1945: V Corps
  14. 6 May 1945: Third Army, 12th Army Group

Narrative

2nd Infantry Division marching up the bluff at the E-1 draw in the Easy Red sector of Omaha Beach on D+1, 7 June 1944. They are going past the German bunker, Widerstandsnest 65, that defended the route up the Ruquet Valley to Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer.
After training in Northern Ireland and Wales from October 1943 to June 1944, the 2nd Infantry Division crossed the channel to land on Omaha Beach on D plus 1 (7 June 1944) near Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer. Attacking across the Aure River on 10 June, the division liberated Trévières and proceeded to assault and secure Hill 192, a key enemy strong point on the road to Saint-Lo. After three weeks of fortifying the position and by order of Commanding General Walter M. Robertson, the order was given to take Hill 192. On 11 July under the command of Col.Ralph Wise Zwicker the 38th Infantry Regiment and with the 9th and the 23rd by his side the battle began at 5:45am. Using an artillery concept from World War I (rolling barrage) and with the support of 25,000 rounds of HE/WP that were fired by 8 artillery battalions, the hill was taken. Except for three days during the Battle of the Bulge, this was the heaviest expenditure of ammunition by the 38th Field Artillery Battalion; And was the only time during the 11 months of combat that 2nd Division artillery used a rolling barrage. The division went on the defensive until 26 July. After exploiting the Saint-Lo breakout, the 2nd Division then advanced across the Vire to take Tinchebray on 15 August 1944. The division then raced toward Brest, the heavily defended port fortress which happened to be a major port for German U-boats. After 39 days of fighting the Battle for Brest was won, and was the first place the Army Air Forces used bunker busting bombs.[citation needed] The division took a brief rest 19–26 September before moving to defensive positions at St. VithBelgium on 29 September 1944. The division entered Germany on 3 October 1944, and was ordered, on 11 December 1944, to attack and seize the Roer River dams. The German Ardennes offensive in mid-December forced the division to withdraw to defensive positions near Elsenborn Ridge, where the German drive was halted. In February 1945 the division attacked, recapturing lost ground, and seized Gemund, 4 March. Reaching the Rhine on 9 March, the division advanced south to take Breisig, 10–11 March, and to guard the Remagen bridge12–20 March. The division crossed the Rhine on 21 March and advanced to Hadamar and Limburg an der Lahn, relieving elements of the 9th Armored Division, 28 March. Advancing rapidly in the wake of the 9th Armored, the 2nd Infantry Division crossed the Weser at Veckerhagen, 6–7 April, captured Göttingen 8 April, established a bridgehead across the Saale, 14 April, seizing Merseburg on 15 April. On 18 April the division took Leipzig, mopped up in the area, and outposted the Mulde River; elements which had crossed the river were withdrawn 24 April. Relieved on the Mulde, the 2nd moved 200 miles, 1–3 May, to positions along the German-Czech border near Schönsee and Waldmünchen, where 2 ID relieved the 97th and 99th ID's. The division crossed over to Czechoslovakia on 4 May 1945, and attacked in the general direction of Pilsen, attacking that city on VE Day. The division lost 3,031 killed in action, 12,785 wounded in action, and 457 died of wounds.
World War II unit history
The 2nd Infantry Division returned to the New York Port of Embarkation on 20 July 1945, and arrived at Camp Swift at Bastrop, Texas on 22 July 1945. They started a training schedule to prepare them to participate in the scheduled invasion of Japan, but they were still at Camp Swift on VJ Day. They then moved to the staging area at Camp Stoneman at Pittsburg, California on 28 March 1946, but the move eastward was canceled, and they received orders to move to Fort Lewis at Tacoma, Washington. They arrived at Fort Lewis on 15 April 1946, which became their home station. From their Fort Lewis base, they conducted Arctic, air transportability, amphibious, and maneuver training.

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